Week 4 reflections

I’m using the structure of the course to reflect on the following questions

What is online facilitation? = The capacity to build and sustain a community of learners using online tools. Learners are people who are willing to change their mind.

What skills do you need as an online facilitator? You need to be able to
– create, demonstrate and sustain a safe and stretching learning environment
– listen and empathise with each community member trying to express themselves using online tools
– model good behaviour that encourages learning and engagement

How does a facilitator build an online community or network? By a rich and compelling invitation and then meeting and exceeding each person’s expectations when they join the community.

What are the key things to remember when facilitating an event, meeting or education course, especially when working with people who are new to online technology? 1. Be aware of treating everyone and yourself with respect. 2. Breathe and be fully present to what is happening. 3. Stay true to the purpose of the event.

What is the difference between teaching and facilitation? Teaching is transmitting knowledge to people with the assumption that they don’t already know. Facilitation is designing and creating a learning environment where people discover (and use) new knowledge and learning for themselves.

What is netiquette? = Internet etiquette. Good personal behaviour on the internet. Good behaviour starts by showing respect for other people, especially when errors are made. An error is an action that results in an unintended result.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Week 4 reflections

  1. I really like your definition of teaching and facilitation. I am wondering how we do that when there is very strict perameters to a course…when there is no or little room for learners to explore or ‘argue’ because of curriculum etc?

  2. markspain says:

    I think if you have strict parameters in a course it is best to be open and transparent with participants. Tell them when you are teaching and when you are facilitating so that they can be conscious of, and make the necessary adjustments to, the different behaviours expected of them as learners.

  3. Karen Humber says:

    Hi Mark,
    Just reflecting on your thoughts about how to build an online community and curious about sustainability and all of what supports that. For example someone where I live started a facebook page for announcements of local events and attracted over 2000 fans within 48 hours. From way too much activity it has dwindled away to almost nothing. What does it take to meet and exceed the expectations of huge groups? It is so easy to just disappear in an online environment and pick up something somewhere. Even with this course I have the wondering if only about 1/3 are actively participating – without actually counting blog posts and elluminate attendance. What would keep everyone engaged and participating?

    • markspain says:

      Hi Karen
      Thanks for your reflections and good questions. I think a community can only be sustained when the purpose and mutual agreements for participation are made clear or created together to build trust, commitment and responsibility.

  4. coachcarole says:

    Hi Mark, I am keen to comment on this quote from your posting above:
    “What are the key things to remember when facilitating an event, meeting or education course, especially when working with people who are new to online technology? 1. Be aware of treating everyone and yourself with respect. 2. Breathe and be fully present to what is happening. 3. Stay true to the purpose of the event.”

    The next step in my process of developing the Eportfolio Community of Practice is to facilitate our first online meeting, using Elluminate. The three things you mention above are critical to the feeling of inclusiveness that I would want participants to feel. Inclusivity is a powerful force for sustaining the purpose of a group; and if harnessed together with collaboration, innovation and connectivity will ensure that the group will become a network and finally a community of practice.

    So I’ve coined a new acronym: ICIC two i’s two c’s – inclusive, collaborative, innovative and connected as the driving force for my EpCoP. These have occurred to me as i READ your postings and make my comments here. Thanks for your inspiration.

    I really like the experience of ‘brainstorming’ online – and it seems it can be done in solititude too. (smiles)

    • markspain says:

      Hi Carole, Thanks for your stimulating reflections. I am also interested in the direction of group evolution you espouse. What do you think are the essential facilitator actions to help the group become inclusive, collaborative, innovative and connected?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s